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Eid al-Adha 9 - 13 July

Eid ul-Adha 2022 is rapidly approaching, the second of the two major Eid festivals celebrated by Muslims each year.

It follows on from Eid ul-Fitr, which is marked at the end of the fasting month of Ramadan, which fell on Monday 2 May.

The date of Eid ul-Adha is based on the sighting of the moon, which means it cannot be calculated with complete accuracy – but here’s when it is predicted to take place this year.


When is Eid 2022?

The Eid ul-Adha festival will begin on the evening of Saturday 9 July and last four days, coming to an end on the evening of Wednesday 13 July.

It falls on the tenth day of Dhul-Hijjah, the twelfth month of the Islamic Hijri calendar, with its date in the Gregorian calendar shifting forward around 11 days each year.

According to Saudi Arabia, whose official verdict is followed by many Muslims across the world, Dhul-Hijjah began on Thursday 30 June, following the sighting of the crescent moon on Wednesday 29 June.

This means that the Eid ul-Adha festival will begin on the evening of Saturday 9 July and last four days, coming to an end on the evening of Wednesday 13 July.


While the date is slightly unpredictable, observers do at least get more warning than with Eid ul-Fitr, when the festival falls right at the start of the month.

There is some debate as to whether the idea of a moon sighting should refer to you physically witnessing the moon in your region, which could be hampered by factors such as weather conditions, or whether to defer to sightings in Saudi Arabia or other regions.


What is the meaning behind Eid ul-Adha?

Known as the “Festival of the Sacrifice” or colloquially as “Big Eid”, Eid ul-Adha is considered the holier of the two Islamic Eid festivals.

It honours the famous story of the willingness of the prophet Ibrahim (known in the Christian Old Testament as Abraham) to sacrifice his son as an act of obedience to God’s command.

However, before Ibrahim carried out the heartbreaking request, God, known as Allah in Islam, produced a lamb for him to sacrifice instead.

To commemorate this, an animal is traditionally sacrificed and divided into three parts in an act known as Qurbani. One part of the sheep is given to the poor, one to the immediate family at home and one is reserved for relatives.

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